Environmental Enlightenment #204
By Ami Adini - June 6, 2013

This is a SHORT, LIGHT and SIMPLE newsletter. Its purpose is to rekindle in the initiated terminology they have once learned, and enlighten the uninitiated on terms they may have heard but never knew the meaning of.

The Elephant Whisperer

With this issue we acquaint you with the late Dr. Lawrence Anthony (17 September 1950 – 2 March 2012), an international conservationist, environmentalist, explorer, and bestselling author.

'Elephant Whisperer' Lawrence Anthony

Some of this letter is copied from Wikipedia and then corrected by Barbara Wiseman, the International President of the Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization and a personal friend of Dr. Anthony. For more information on this fascinating soul go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Anthony

Additional information is excerpted from the Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization (LAEO) website at http://www.TheEarthOrganization.org

Lawrence Anthony, the “Elephant Whisperer,” was the owner and long-standing head of conservation at the Thula Thula game reserve in Zululand South Africa and the Founder of the Lawrence Anthony Earth Organization (LAEO), a privately registered, independent, international conservation and environmental group with a strong scientific orientation.

Anthony had a reputation for bold conservation initiatives, including the rescue of the Baghdad Zoo at the height of the US lead Coalition 2003 invasion of Iraq, and negotiations with the infamous Lord's Resistance Army rebel army in Southern Sudan, which resulted in the cessation of hostilities between the LRA and the Ugandan government for two years.  His purpose was to raise awareness of the environment and protect endangered species, including the last of the Northern White Rhinoceros

Anthony died of a heart attack in March 2012, 300 kilometers away from his game preserve. Yet, following his death, the herd of wild elephants that had befriended him came to his home and stayed for several hours.  They then moved off into the deep thicket for several days where they couldn’t be seen, in accordance with the way elephants usually mourn the death of one of their own.

Lawrence’s almost mythological relationship with a herd of wild elephants has been awe-inspiring to millions of people around the world.  After bringing the traumatized and troublesome herd to his game reserve, Lawrence lived with them for 3 weeks, staying just out of harm’s way, until the matriarch adopted him and settled down in their new home.  The herd basically adopted him as one of their own and developed a level of communication that made it possible for them to know whenever he was away from the reserve, and the day he came back.  Every single time he returned, the herd would show up at his house that night to greet him.  After not having come to his house for several months, two days after he passed away, the whole herd came to his house for a few hours, and they mourned his death for several days.  http://earthorganization.com/News.aspx?tid=115

 lawrence-anthony-elephants-1.jpg

Quotations:

  • "Our inability to think beyond our own species, or to be able to co-habit with other life forms in what is patently a massive collaborative quest for survival, is surely a malady that pervades the human soul."
  • "Workable solutions for Earth are urgently needed. Saving seals and tigers, or fighting yet another oil pipeline through a wilderness area, while laudable, is merely shuffling the deck chairs on the Titanic."
  • "Thankfully the Earth has an incredible capacity to sustain life, so perhaps something can still be done about it."

In April of 2013, the third anniversary of British Petroleum’s oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, LAEO released a position paper, A Call for a Twenty-First-Century SOLUTION in Oil Spill Response.
http://protectmarinelifenow.org/solutions

The paper brings to light the dangerous flaws associated with current oil spill cleanup methods and outlines technology LAEO claims will not only save marine life, oceans, animals and people, but also save millions (and in BP’s case could have saved billions) of dollars in damages and cleanup costs to oil companies and local economies impacted by spills.

The Alaskan Inter-Tribal Council that represents 240 tribes, most of whom continue to be impacted by the Exxon Valdez spill, is now working with LAEO on effective, wholesome handling to the continued problem of oil spills in their territories.

You can find past issues of "Environmental Enlightenment" at www.amiadini.com with wealth of information about issues concerning assessment and cleanup of contamination in the subsurface soil and groundwater.

Call me if you have any questions. There are no obligations.

Ami Adini
Ami Adini & Associates, Inc.
Environmental Consultants
Underground Storage Tank Experts
818-824-8102; 818-824-8112 fax
mail@amiadini.com
www.amiadini.com

Ami Adini is a mechanical engineer, California Registered Environmental Assessor, Level II, and president of AMI ADINI & ASSOCIATES, INC. (AA&A), an environmental consulting firm specializing in all phases of environmental site assessments and rehabilitation of contaminated sites. AA&A specializes in practical solutions to environmental concerns using the highest standards of ethics and integrity while providing its clients with maximum return on their investments.