Environmental Enlightenment #140

By Ami Adini - Reissued January 11, 2016

This is a SHORT, LIGHT and SIMPLE newsletter. Its purpose is to rekindle in the initiated terminology they have once learned, and enlighten the uninitiated on terms they may have heard but never known the meaning of.

Hydraulic Gradient

In groundwater that is open to atmospheric pressure (unconfined aquifers), hydraulic gradient  is the degree of inclination of the water table, usually described as the number of feet the water table drops per mile.


The diagrams above and below depict an unconfined aquifer where the water table is exposed to the atmospheric pressure through the pores in the soil.  The datum level is a reference level from where elevations are measured — the mean sea level (msl) is most frequently used. The hydraulic head is the elevation of the groundwater table, usually measured in feet. For example, 180 feet above mean sea level (amsl).

The difference between “Head 1” and “Head 2” divided over the distance gives the gradient.

For example, if “Head 1” is 180 feet amsl and “Head 2” is 170 feet amsl, and the distance is 1,000 feet, then the Gradient is (180 – 170)/1000 = 0.01 foot per foot.

Gradient is slope. Standing on a steep incline, you can measure its slope in any direction, but usually you pay most attention to the greatest of slopes because this is where you’d fall the hardest

Same with groundwater, the greatest gradient tells us the direction where the water would essentially flow.

The diagram below depicts the gradient and its direction (west-southwest) in the water table under a leaking underground storage tank site. The parallel lines are lines of same elevation on the plane that represents the groundwater table. The line perpendicular to these lines indicated the greatest gradient and its direction.  The amount of the gradient is named as a dimensionless rate of 0.0029 which can be translated to feet of elevation for every foot of distance, centimeters of elevation for every centimeter of distance or light years of elevation for every light year of distance. If you want to know the gradient in feet per mile, multiply the number by 5,280 (feet per mile) and you’ll get 15.31.

 

You can find past issues of our  "Environmental Enlightenment" at amiadini.com Wealth of information about environmental site assessments in the real estate transactions and issues concerning assessment and cleanup of contamination in the subsurface soil and groundwater.

Call me if you have any questions. There are no obligations.

Ami Adini
Ami Adini & Associates, Inc.
Environmental Consultants
Underground Storage Tank Experts
818-824-8102; mail@amiadini.com
www.amiadini.com

Ami Adini is a mechanical engineer, California Registered Environmental Assessor, Level II (Exp.), and president of AMI ADINI & ASSOCIATES, INC. (AA&A), an environmental consulting firm specializing in all phases of environmental site assessments and rehabilitation of contaminated sites. AA&A specializes in practical solutions to environmental concerns using the highest standards of ethics and integrity while providing its clients with maximum return on their investments.